Skills Training and Workforce Development

Training

skills-trainingOver the course of the next few years, it is estimated that 50% of automotive service technicians will begin to retire; the industry and ESDC predict that there will not be sufficient numbers of technicians to keep pace with the attrition. The independent installer represents the core market for the traditional aftermarket. AIA believes government skills training policies must include skills required to maintain technically complex vehicles for consumers once they are manufactured, and will work with government on a number of initiatives to ensure this happens.


Financial Incentives

Initiatives include: tax credits for apprenticeships; tax credits to employers who participate in coop education/work programs or accredited apprenticeship programs; support and funding for hands-on training to more apprentices, including equipment upgrades; co-marketing of auto sector jobs with academia; industry-government working groups to improve the image of automotive careers; improving transferability of credentials between colleges and universities; and the use technology to overcome cost, time, and geographic barriers to training, especially for small businesses.


Women in the Automotive Aftermarket Industry

women-automotiveWhile building a campaign to promote a better image of the industry and the types of jobs in high demand, AIA is also focusing its efforts on recruiting more women into the sector by creating a leadership network to ensure women are represented at the executive level in automotive aftermarket organizations.

According to a 2009 report by Canadian Automotive Repair and Service and funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program, “women are the most significantly under-represented group in the motive power and repair sector, especially at the shop level. Since they make up nearly half of the overall Canadian workforce, women also represent the largest potential growth area for the MPRS sector”.

Women currently working in the sector work in various capacities: admin, HR, sales and marketing, jobbers, service technicians, service advisors, and collision repair specialists. They can be working for large fortune 500 companies or in local independent shops or garages. They can also be small business entrepreneurs running their own shops.


Resources

For more information on our provincial initiatives, please see the corresponding section on our website.





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